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פורום בינלאומי לנושא סת"ם

Wednesday, June 15, 2016

Lishmoh controversy

I have always been in the practice of saying "kol mah s'hani osay hayom..." before switching on my desk lamp and working for the day, as a precaution lest I forget to say "leshaim" before making a correction or even a kesher etc. I have always understood that this is bedieved OK and covers you if you forget. I instruct my staff who sew tefillin to do the same.

Yet recently, someone told me that this is not worth anything and if you forget you cannot be "covered" by a proclamation at the beginning of they day. He did not provide me with any sources but if anyone knows if there is basis to this, please comment...

6 comments:

  1. R' Eli,

    I have no sources. I'm just wondering: do you have a source that indicates that your practice is of value?

    I know others who do it to.

    Tx.

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  2. It's better than nothing, so why not say it even if the pashtus is it doesn't "really" work? Even if you forget to say lishmah later in the day, we will be meikil anyway because for most things we can say סתמא לשמה because they are obviously done for the sake of mezuzah, Tefillin, etc.
    I heard once from a reliable source that Rav Elyashiv didn't like it, but that may just have been in the context of מצות מצוה where most of the processes are not סתמא לשמה--winnowing, grinding, kneading, etc. could be for any bread.

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  3. From the Stimas Halashon in the Shulchan Aruch (Yoreh Deah 274:1) it implies even more, if one had said Lesheim... it would help for the entire sefer torah (besides for the names of Hashem).
    I never fully understood why we do not worry of hesech hadaas in this case. Perhaps the leniency is when one is working on sta"m we do not assume there will be a hesach hadaas (at least after a verbal declaration was previously stated.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's because you're simply continuing the same activity and therefore are obviously doing it for the same purpose as when you started.

      Delete
  4. See Zichron Eliyahu for the appropriate language and what it covers.

    ReplyDelete

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